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Trotineta electrica MAX Doua roti cu frane hidraulice E Trotineta

Will new technology tame these two-wheeled terrors? Rentable e-scooters arrived in Salt Lake City three years ago in much the same way they debuted in cities around the world – unannounced, unregulated and, for at least some folks, unwelcome. E-scooters: Urban blight or sweet new ride?

$3,188.00

Descriere

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Parametru
Inrameaza-leAliaj de aluminiu de înaltă rezistență 6061, vopsea de suprafață
Furci cu furciUna formând furca față și furca spate
Utilaje electriceMotor de mare viteză dinți fără perii de 14 "84V 20000W
operator de date cu caracter personal, 72V 150SAH*2 controler fără perii sinusoidal vector tub (tip mini)
BaterieBaterie cu litiu modul 84V 90AH-150AH (Tian energy 21700)
ContorViteza LCD, temperatura, afișarea puterii și afișarea defecțiunilor
GPSLocație și două alarme de control
Sistem de frânareun singur disc, nu conține substanțe nocive, în conformitate cu cerințele internaționale de mediu
Mâner de frânăFrână de forjare din aliaj de aluminiu cu funcție de rupere a puterii
AnvelopeAnvelopa ZhengXin de 14 inch
FarFaruri și faruri lenticulare cu LED-uri luminoase
Viteza maxima125km
Extensie kilometraj155-160km
Motor10000 watt pe bucată
Roată14inch
Greutatea netă și greutatea brută64kg / 75kg
Dimensiune produsL*l*h: 1300*560*1030 (mm)
ambalareL*l*h: 1330*320*780 (mm)

 

Scutere electrice cu ridicata

Scutere electrice cu ridicata

Trotineta electrica pentru adulti

Trotineta electrica pentru adulti

Patinetes Electricos Para Adultos

Patinetes Electricos Para Adultos

Scooter electric off-road

Scooter electric off-road

trotinete electrice 15kw

trotinete electrice 15kw

Trotineta electrica pentru persoane grele

Trotineta electrica pentru persoane grele

In 2020, I wrote a story analyzing a year’s worth of records that included resident correspondence with Salt Lake officials over issues related to e-scutere as well as the results of a survey overseen by the transportation department that collected local sentiment on e-scooters. “While I feel the city should ban the use of e-scooters and e-bikes completely, at a minimum, they should be controlled with city ordinance and strict enforcement,” the emailer wrote. One downtown resident who wrote that e-scooter riders were “threatening pedestrians on a daily basis” called for an outright ban on the “dangerous vehicles,” but in lieu of that wanted to see ramped-up enforcement. An overwhelming majority of those emails railed against their use, with many citing hazardous sidewalk encounters as well as haphazard parking. And the city’s survey effort showed a marked divide with wide support coming from those who tried out the scooters and mostly condemnation from those who hadn’t. “I and all other downtown residents walking the sidewalks face the physical threat and the emotional toll of unexpected severe injury on a daily basis, which is destroying the livability and walkability of downtown Salt Lake.
Spin has developed new technology that will give feedback to riders allowing them to follow city rules when riding the e-scooters. Could new technology trickling down from self-driving vehicle research revamp the landscape for electric scooters that, over the past four years, has rattled government leaders and pushed pedestrians to the breaking point? But the biggest knock on the vehicles in Utah and everywhere else they’ve roosted is they become a nightmare when mixed in with pedestrian traffic (even on Salt Lake City’s mostly deluxe-width sidewalks). The scooters are easy (and a lot of fun) to ride and widely hailed by experts as an excellent, albeit seasonal cure for one of the hardest pieces of the public transportation puzzle to solve – the so-called “first and last mile” connections that get us from our homes or work to transit hubs and back again. Will new technology tame these two-wheeled terrors? Rentable e-scooters arrived in Salt Lake City three years ago in much the same way they debuted in cities around the world – unannounced, unregulated and, for at least some folks, unwelcome. E-scooters: Urban blight or sweet new ride?
Our time for action is now. Much of the correspondence rang a similar tone, and council members followed up by passing a set of sweeping rule changes at the end of last year. Unlike some of its competitors, Spin took the time to give notice, acquire a business license and work with Salt Lake leaders before distributing its bright orange vehicles on city streets in 2019. Now, it’s also leading the pack in bringing the new sensor technology to the market and provided me with a demo last week. Of course these new mandates came at the end of a year in which the streets of the state’s capital city were quieted by the impacts of COVID-19, and negative encounters have simply not been a thing. But as the first glimmers of spring and a post-vaccination world appear on the horizon, city officials are in the midst of whittling down the number of e-scooter vendors, currently a group of four, down to just one or two. The effort codified guidelines that have been part of the interim agreements under which e-scooter businesses in Salt Lake City have been operating for the past couple years while adding some new measures, including potential fines for individuals who misbehave on scooters that can reach $750 per incident. A distinct drumbeat warning sounded within a second every time I rolled onto a sidewalk and even abrupt on-off maneuvers were quickly detected. Try as I might, I was unable to fool the system into failure.
One company even tried a sit-down version, and though all are intended for a single rider, I comfortably accommodated a 7-year-old for occasional duo-rides around Liberty Park. Performance carrots have been balanced with sticks in the form of potential fines for vendors that don’t respond quickly to removing scooters left in hazardous and/or inappropriate locations. Along the way, Salt Lake City has taken a few shots at reining in unfettered scooter expansion, placing limits on total number of scooters any single vendor can put out on the streets and stipulating where those vehicles can, and cannot go. When’s the last time you’ve seen a beat cop walking the streets of downtown and, for that matter, how would one handle the hot pursuit of a rogue scooter rider? The directions have included offering bonuses for ensuring that neighborhoods with the biggest transit access challenges – like areas west of the freeway – get regular drop-offs. But enforcement has been essentially nonexistent as a matter of resources and simple logistics.
When that happens the device can trigger an audible warning or slow the vehicle down to a crawl until it is steered back to a street or bike lane. Since then as many as six operators have tried to entice Salt Lake riders with systems that are more or less identical when it comes to software, though deploying electric scooters that range from beefy, overbuilt workhorses to all-plastic versions that seem more like toys than commuter vehicles. In short, the innovation is set to be a game changer. The same system can also detect when a scooter is being parked where it shouldn’t and give another distinct audio signal until the vehicle is placed in an approved area. While the first U.S.-based versions of the rentable e-scooter platforms showed up in California in 2017, it took until the following summer for Salt Lake City to see its own two-wheelers on the streets (and yes, sidewalks) in an arrival that was expected but nevertheless went down during the dark of night and without warning.
The scooters also create potential hazards and obstacles when carelessly dropped by riders in the middle of walkways, near the entrances of businesses and in areas where the vehicles block wheelchair and disability access to buildings and public transit stops. Now, new technology that outfits each scooter with a camera that can “see” the surfaces on which it’s traveling, coupled with onboard computing power that improves over time and can adapt to changing streetscapes, is capable of detecting when a rider is operating illegally. The zippy two-wheelers operate via software that lives on your smartphone and helps users both locate available vehicles, and pay for their rides, typically a $1 unlocking charge and 30 to 40 cents per mile for the journey. Devin Youngblood, morning shift lead for Spin, rides one of the company’s e-scooters on Main Street in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, March 9, 2021. Spin has developed new technology that will give feedback to riders allowing them to follow city rules when riding the e-scooters.
The beefy motor also takes you up hills with ease. We also liked the Explore’s colorful display, but it was hard to read in daylight. And, because it has dual suspension and air-filled tires, it offers a smooth ride, even when going over the bumpiest of roads. But all this comes at a price: The Explore costs $1,299, and, at 52 pounds, is a lot to lug up stairs. But on the road, this scooter is a beast. Turn on the Apollo Explore’s lights, and you’re in for a visual treat: Blue running lights along both sides of the scooter will make everyone turn their heads. You won’t win any drag races on the GoTrax XR Ultra, but this affordable electric scooter will get you where you need to go. If you want something even faster, check out our Apollo Ghost review: That model goes up to 35 MPH and has a range of up to 39 miles, as well as a key ignition lock. Read our full Apollo Explore review.
We also really liked the Kickscooter Max’s bell, which was beefy and loud enough to clear people out of our path. However, its range is a bit more limited, and it struggles up hills more than scooters such as the Glion Dolly. Read our full Swagtron Swagger 5 review. Read our full Segway Ninebot Kick scooter Max review. It’s well-equipped, with a collapsible chassis, a 250-watt motor, and an air-filled front tire, which makes for a smooth ride. The Swagtron Swagger 5 Elite is another affordable scooter, though this one is a little faster at a top speed of 18 mph. Because of its ultra-folding design, the Glion Dolly is the best electric scooter for those who have to take it on public transportation. The Swagger 5 weighs 27.5 pounds and supports up to 320 pounds on the journey. It also comes with a shock-absorbent spring and a phone mount, which you can use to monitor the Swagger’s top speed and battery power along with the Swagtron companion app.
Battery life/range: After price, this will be the next deciding factor for many. Speed: Most electric scooters will top out at around 15 to 18 miles per hour on a flat road. If you live in a particularly hilly area (or want to go fast) you’ll want a motor with higher wattage. It’s a bit difficult to provide an accurate estimate of battery life and range, because it’s dependent on a variety of factors, including the rider’s weight, the temperature, and the terrain – if you’re riding on flat surfaces, you’ll be able to go much farther than if you’re riding up and down hills. Motors: The majority of electric scooters will have a single hub-mounted motor (meaning the motor is built into the wheel itself), and will typically have a power rating of 250 to 350 Watts. Battery life is typically measured in Amp Hours (aH); the higher the number, the longer you’ll be able to ride. That’s plenty fast for most uses, but there are scooters that will zip along at speeds in excess of 25 MPH.

The Unagi has a large, bright display, easy to use controls, a built-in horn, and bright head- and taillights. While It weighs more than 40 pounds – heavier than most models – it has a battery that will last up to 40 miles on a charge, which is double that of many other scooters. It also has a sleek design that’s sure to turn heads, and you can even get a custom skin as an add-on. And, it’s powerful enough to get you up pretty steep hills. If you’re looking for something for your child, be sure to check out cele mai bune scutere electrice for kids, as well as our guide to the best bike helmets. If you need a scooter that can go the distance, we recommend the Segway Ninebot Kickscooter Max. However, the Unagi Model one is a pricey $990, though you can also find it for less, and Unagi lets you rent it for as low as $39 per month.

Informații suplimentare

Greutate65 kg
Dimensiuni145 × × 55 65 cm

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  • Marca: OEM/ODM/Haibadz
  • Cantitate minima: 1 bucata / bucati
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  • Port: Shenzhen/GuangZhou
  • Condiții de plată: T/T/, L/C, PAYPAL, D/A, D/P
  • Preț 1 bucată: 3188 USD per bucată
  • Preț 10 bucată: 3125 USD per bucată

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